1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director

Ken Blair

  Ken grew up in the rural south and came to Poulsbo via California thirty years ago. Inspired by the Pacific Northwest and influenced by country life as a boy, Ken’s pieces speaks of those images.
   He has been with the Verksted Gallery for over twenty three years and his work can be seen in many local businesses, schools, and churches. He started out as a stained glass artist, but has now moved on to Upcycling. He finds old fire extingishers, old copper bits and makes new sculptures from them. He has completed pieces  in Japan, England, Guam, Hawaii, and Scotland.
   Whether you want to disguise a bad view, enhance the light, or create privacy, Ken truly enjoys working on commission pieces with customer input.
Contact Information:
360  697- 3879
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Jerry Lyman, the creator of Buckhorn Crafts came to the area in 1964 with his wife Karen. In the early 1970's, Jerry began experimenting with antler art by making a cribbage board for his father, after seeing an unusual cribbage board on display in Canada. Each spring, antlers are shed from deer, elk, moose and caribou. This painless process enables the animals to grow larger, more majestic antlers. Having always enjoyed the out-of-doors, Jerry willingly scours the mountains to collect fallen antlers for his unusual creations. Since his retirement, he spends even more time collecting the antlers. Jerry cuts, carves, drills and polishes the antler into many creative items, including one-of-a-kind cribbage boards, jewelry and buttons. The newest items added are fireplace and grilling tools. Many of Jerry's creations are enhanced by pen and ink sketches done by Karen.
   Mother Nature determines the beauty of these pieces of antler art. Several factors affect the color and texture of antlers. The first factor is the food and minerals available to the animals during the six-month growth period. Good conditions result in larger and more solid antlers. The second factor depends on where the antlers were shed, and how long they have been on the ground. In wet areas moss and algae growing on them penetrate the antler providing the green and pink colors that are sometimes found. In dry areas the color is bleached from the antlers, weather checks appear and some take on the color of the soil. The third factor is if the animal sheds the antlers near a squirrel's home, the critters will take advantage of the calcium and leave chew marks. All of these factors contribute to the beautiful colors and textures seen in the hand-crafted product. By filing, sanding and polishing these pieces of antler, the beauty provided by Mother Nature is richly enhanced.
Contact Information:

360-297-7575
Email: mitzer@centurytel.net

Jerry Lyman

  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director

Bob Rau

  I have always enjoyed working with my hands to create something of interest or beauty, but for many years, my hobbies were put aside due to the demands of work.

   Upon retirement, my goals included resuming my long abandoned hobby of working with stained glass and regaining proficiency in playing the plectrum banjo as well as learning to play blues style slide guitar.

  I was intrigued by the cigar box guitars displayed at Pike Place Market and then set out to learn more about the instruments. I thought that building one would be fun and give me a guitar that could be played with a slide. My research led me to the discovery of the rebirth of a craft that began during the Civil War. During the mid 1800’s, most folks were dirt poor and their desire to make music demanded that they build an instrument out of whatever was handy. A cigar box, a broomstick, and a piece of wire from a screen door could be fashioned into a musical instrument.

  
   There are many cigar box guitar builders around the country who have joined the revolution and make instruments of various styles and quality. I’m inspired by interesting cigar boxes or other objects and create what I call playable art. It all starts with the box. Then the decision is whether to make it acoustic, include a resonator, or add a magnetic pickup, scale length, fretboard wood, headstock shape and many other decisions affecting colors, sounds, and style. It’s exciting to see all of the elements come together organically to become an instrument that can be displayed on someone’s wall as a piece of art, or taken down to make music.

   One thing led to another and, to complement the guitars, I build battery-powered portable amplifiers, which can also be used as MP3 players. It gives me a great deal of pleasure to build an instrument that is unique and could be proudly displayed, and played, in someone’s home. By the way, I’ve been so occupied building the instruments and amplifiers that I haven’t yet taken the time to learn to play with a slide.